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Showing posts from November, 2015

Castle Cluggy at Ochtertyre

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Castle Cluggy ( written in 1880  by the Rev William Marshall in his book Historic Scenes of Perthshire )

“ Castle Cluggy on the peninsula on the north of the Loch of Monzievaird ( pronounced mony- vaird ) is a very old erection When it was built is not known but it was old upwards of four centuries ago. In the Charter  giving Ochtertyre to the Murrays , and bearing the date  of 1467 , it is described as an antiquum fortalicium . It is now reduced to a square tower of about seventeen feet  by eighteen , within walls ; but it was once very much larger . Its walls are five to six feet thick and as hard as adamant . In olden times the peninsula on which it stands was an island , separated from the bank of the Loch  by a narrow isthmus over which was  drawbridge , so it must have been a fortalice of great strength . If tradition may be credited , this castle  may well be regarded as an Historic Scene ; for it is said to have been a seat of the Red Cumin ( Comyn ) , the rival of Bruce for t…

Ewan and Uncle Denis

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The success of Ewan McGregor has been quite phenomenal and despite the historical tendencies of this “blog” , it is relevant and essential to include something about him and indeed his uncleDenis Lawson in my tales of Strathearn . I happen to have know the family for a long time and so the following is more a personal commentary than a biographical synopsis . Having spent many a happy holiday in Crieff as a school boy and visiting my young brother in law Gavin who was a boarder at Morrisons , it was perhaps not surprising that we chose to settle down in the town in the 1970s to bring up our young family . As a member of the local Round Table I met Jim McGregor and his wife Carol and at the same time joined the local film club in which they both were leading lights . Carol ‘s dad Lawrie Lawson had a small jeweller’s shop in East High Street in what is now the Carpet Shop . They eventually moved down to West High Street and when Lawrie died his wife Phyllis continued the business for ma…
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Crieff  And Some Of Its Artefacts

Action Now ! 


The Cross of Crieff
The ancient town of Crieff has a number of tangible items of significant historical importance . There are however  four specific civic artefacts which have a particular importance to its good Burghers and I believe it important that these  find a suitable  home within the town as a matter of some urgency .What then are these  four "specifics" that I refer to  ? Let  me list  them below : 


1. The ancient stocks ( or jougs as they were known locally ) 
2. The Mercat or Drummond Cross 
3. The Cross of Crieff 
4.  And last but not least , the remaining part - or the gibbet - of the Kind Gallows of Crieff

 Below is a description of these written some one hundred and fifty five years ago in 1860 . This  appeared  in what arguably  was the first  tourist  guide to the area , entitled  simply the “ Beauties of Upper Strathearn “ !

The Kind Gallows currently lie in the basement of the Perth Museum awaiting repatriation  to …

Fowlis Castle - A Forgotten Part of Strathearn’s Heritage

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Once the Powerbase of the Earls of Strathearn now a pile of stones !


A commanding view from the Castle over the Strath

 Robert the Bruce - an unwelcome visitor to Fowlis  !




Having put on  over  100 “ blogs “ in some two years  of  scribing  , I am aware that some of the earlier ones might in probability  have been missed  by  many of  you. One in particular in February 2012 concerned  Fowlis Castle  near the  picturesque  village of Fowlis  Wester to the  east of Crieff . What  compounds the  general confusion over the Castle  is that there are in fact two  other castles  of the same name in Scotland – one  near Dundee and another near  Evanton north of Inverness ! The spelling does  vary  between  Fowlis and Foulis and it is  not  made  any easier  by the pronunciation  which is “ Fowls “ ( as in a number of  hens ! ) .
Fowlis Castle is a most neglected part of our local heritage . Incredibly it is  no longer shown on the current Ordnance survey maps and is virtually forgotten by one a…