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Who were the Culdees and why were they in Muthill ?

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1900 pic of Muthill Parish Church1. Culdees in Muthill


I have  a particular interest in the religious  sect  known as the Culdees . I lived for a number of years in an old  stone  house in Muthill called “ Little Culdees ” It had been built circa 1790 using stones from the remnants of Culdees Castle in what is now the farm and estate of the Maitland Gardners . A somewhat be- turreted idiosyncratic dwelling located over a flowing burn and distinctive  but with its  stone slabbed flooring perhaps the coldest house I have  ever lived in !


" Little Culdees " from a painting by my old friend the late Norman Aiton of Muthill

Who then were the Culdees ?  Culdees were holy men who loved solitude and lived by the labour of their hands. Gradually they came together in a community, still occupying separate cells, still much alone and in communion with God  but meeting in the refectory and in the church, and giving obedience to a comm…

Strageath Mill and Churchyard

Comrie of Old

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Comrie of Old

Drove leaving Comrie




Looking at the Parish of Comrie in the 1792/93 Account, we note that the staple industry is linen yarn  " of which a great quantity is spun and sold each year. With the money which this yarn brings,most of the farmers pay a great part of their rents.This yarn sells at about 2/4 d per spindle " (i.e. about 11 pence in present currency ). Very much a cottage industry, the small farmers or cottars produced a variety of cloths to suit their needs. The lint was spun into a yarn and from that a cloth was produced . The finer cloth was made into men and women's shirts whilst the coarser was turned into " sailors jackets and trousers ". Comrie in the 18th century was a Highland village unlike its near neighbour Crieff some seven miles to the east . The women of the Parish produced a great quantity of  " plaiden cloth " and a considerable quantity of tartan from which they made plaids and hose . The Account tells us …

" Dead " good way to improve sales !

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Thanks to the Weavers !
If it wasna for the weavers, what would ye do?

Ye wouldna hae your cloth that's made o woo.

Ye wouldna hae your cloak neither black nor blue

If it wasna for the wark o the weavers!


Linen had been a major industry in Scotland for hundreds of years; by 1684 an estimated 12,000 people were employed its manufacture. The industry was stimulated by an act of the Scottish  Parliament of 1686 stipulating that everyone had to be buried in linen winding sheets made from materials which had been grown, spun and woven in Scotland

Who were the Picts ?

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Who were the Picts ?


Picts , Gaels and Scots ( Foster, SM, 1996)





Who were the Picts ?

Picts , Gaels and Scots ( Foster, SM, 1996) Classical and later historic sources use a variety of evolving terms to signify the people who inhabited Scotland and /or their territorial divisions prior to the late eighth century. Of these terms Picti , first recorded in 297 and derived from the Picts’ own name for themselves , or possibly a Roman nickname meaning ” the painted ones” , has been the most enduring . Then as in later Classical sources, the Picts were referred to as assailants of the Roman frontier in Britain. Much ink has been spilt over what the ancient writers meant by Picts, but it seems to be a generic term for people living north of the Forth - Clyde isthmus who raided the Roman Empire. There is a distinction in archaeological remains to north and south of the Forth- Clyde isthmus in the early centuries which would seem to support this definition, although some archaeologists argue that …

Weaving in Auchterarder

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Weaving in Auchterarder   
                      Growth and demise of hand loom weaving and the mills of the town 



Hand loom weavers