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LADY MARY'S WALK AND LAGGAN HILL
WALKS AROUND STRATHEARN NO. 1

This walk was a favourite of Lady Mary Murray, whose family were local landowners in the early 19th century. The route is one of the most popular in Perthshire and provides a peaceful stroll beside the beautiful River Earn, along an avenue of mature oak, beech, lime and sweet chestnut trees. Some of the larger trees are in the region of 150 to 200 years old. The walk is a delight at any time of year and is particularly photogenic in the late autumn when the beech trees are a riot of rust and gold. Herons, kingfishers, grey wagtails, oystercatchers and dippers live on the river and otters have been seen at dusk. Also watch out for trout and salmon rising on the water to feed. 








Begin at the bridge in Taylor/MacRosty Park near where there is a large parking area. Turn left onto the path alongside the Turret Burn and then through a small gate to reach the banks of the River Earn, where Lady Mary's Walk begins. The route h…
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St Fillan


Historic Scenes of Perthshire
Published Originally in 1880 by a Perthshire Minister
(Marshall, 1880)



"As we approach Loch Earn, we come to a scene consecrated by its connection with the famous St Fillan, who evangelised the country here and in the wilds of Breadalbane, and whose arm did such wonders on the field of Bannockburn. The beautiful hill covered with verdure to the top, and the green of which contrasts so strikingly with the brown and the grey of the adjacent heights, is Dunfillan, the hill of St Fillan. The rock on the top of it was the Saint’s Chair. The spring, now days at the foot of the it, was the Saint’s Well. It was originally on the top of the hill; but, disgusted with the Reformation from Popery, which, like Archbishop Laud, it regarded as rather the “ Deformation “, it removed to the foot of the hill. St Fillan drank of the waters of this Well, and blessed them. The consequence was that they were endowed with miraculous healing powers; and, till even a…

The Union of Parliaments 1707

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1.Two Unions

There were in  fact  two Unions , the Union of the Crowns in 1603 and the Union of the Parliaments in 1707. The   former occurred when Elizabeth 1  died  childless and  was succeeded  by James  Vl of Scotland (a second  cousin ) who became James 1 of the United Kingdoms of Scotland and England . Both  countries continued  to have their own Parliaments and separate legal systems .

2. The Darien Scheme



In 1632 Scotland lost Nova Scotia – her only colony – as a resultof the English war against France. England’s Dutch wars subsequently compromised valuable trading privileges upon which Scottish merchants had previously relied. Scottish overseas trading activity was further hampered by the Navigation Act, which cut Scottish ships out of international trade by forbidding the import of goods into England or her colonies unless carried in English ships or ships from the goods’ country of origin. Beginning in 1651, the goal of the Act was to force colonial development into lines fav…

Who were the Picts ?

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Who were the Picts ?


Picts , Gaels and Scots ( Foster, SM, 1996)





Who were the Picts ?

Picts , Gaels and Scots ( Foster, SM, 1996)
Classical and later historic sources use a variety of evolving terms to signify the people who inhabited Scotland and /or their territorial divisions prior to the late eighth century. Of these terms Picti , first recorded in 297 and derived from the Picts’ own name for themselves , or possibly a Roman nickname meaning ” the painted ones” , has been the most enduring . Then as in later Classical sources, the Picts were referred to as assailants of the Roman frontier in Britain. Much ink has been spilt over what the ancient writers meant by Picts, but it seems to be a generic term for people living north of the Forth - Clyde isthmus who raided the Roman Empire. There is a distinction in archaeological remains to north and south of the Forth- Clyde isthmus in the early centuries which would seem to support this definition, although some archaeologists argue that …
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The Story of Weaving and Textiles in Crieff










If it wasna for the weavers , what would you do ? Ye wouldna hae your cloth that’s made o woo Ye wouldna hae your cloak neither black nor blue If it wasna for the wark o the weavers !

Linen had been a major industry in Scotland for hundreds of years; by 1684 an estimated 12,000 people were employed its manufacture. The industry was stimulated by an Act of Parliament of 1686 stipulating that everyone had to be buried in linen winding sheets made from materials which had been grown, spun and woven in Scotland. Further stimulus came from the Act of 1748 prohibiting the importing or wearing of French cambrics, "under severe penalties"; and that of 1751 which allowed weavers to work in all parts of Scotland "free of all corporation dues, conjoined with a bounty of 1 1/2 d. [0.6 pence] per yard on all linens exported at and under 18d [7.5 pence] per yard." Linen had by this time become Scotland's most important export. Although…